A Natural Interest

Natural history has been a lifelong passion for me and I’m very grateful that I was born with such a consuming interest. It doesn’t matter where you are there is always something to see, whether it’s that tenacious Buddleia growing out of a building, twelve feet up, ants running about on a pavement, deer dashing across a field or snakes in the compost heap, life is never boring. Seventeen years working as a veterinary nurse brought me into contact with many wildlife patients and they taught me a lot about themselves. After a few years nursing I felt I needed another angle to my job, so did a teacher training course and taught animal care at an agricultural college.

Norfolk is a wonderful county in which to live for those of us who have an interest in natural history and I’m pleased to share this diary, which first appeared in ‘Town & Country News,’ with you all. I hope that my observations and thoughts will give you pleasure. I am always interested to hear about anything you may come across in the natural world and if you have any questions I will try my best to answer them for you.

Email me on sheila@norfolknaturediary.uk

© Sheila Sims

August 2019

Honey bees are in trouble. Not only because of the destruction of their habitats and the over- use of chemicals but last year’s strange weather pattern with spring being almost a month behind in some parts of the country, meant … Continue reading

July 2019

After last months column, in which I included a piece about the Great tits which nested in our garden urn, two people have contacted me about unusual nesting sites. Debbie and Keith have a pair of Robins which have built … Continue reading

June 2019

This month is right in the middle of the birthing season for Red deer which runs from mid May until mid July; usually one fawn is born but occasionally there can be two. The hind will hide away to give … Continue reading

May 2019

This month Rhododendrons start to come into flower and very beautiful they are; Sheringham Park is a good place to see them in all their glory. The original wild Rhododendron is native to parts of Asia and the southern Mediterranean … Continue reading