A Natural Interest

Natural history has been a lifelong passion for me and I’m very grateful that I was born with such a consuming interest. It doesn’t matter where you are there is always something to see, whether it’s that tenacious Buddleia growing out of a building, twelve feet up, ants running about on a pavement, deer dashing across a field or snakes in the compost heap, life is never boring. Seventeen years working as a veterinary nurse brought me into contact with many wildlife patients and they taught me a lot about themselves. After a few years nursing I felt I needed another angle to my job, so did a teacher training course and taught animal care at an agricultural college.

Norfolk is a wonderful county in which to live for those of us who have an interest in natural history and I’m pleased to share this diary, which first appeared in ‘Town & Country News,’ with you all. I hope that my observations and thoughts will give you pleasure. I am always interested to hear about anything you may come across in the natural world and if you have any questions I will try my best to answer them for you.

Email me on sheila@norfolknaturediary.uk

© Sheila Sims

July 2019

After last months column, in which I included a piece about the Great tits which nested in our garden urn, two people have contacted me about unusual nesting sites. Debbie and Keith have a pair of Robins which have built … Continue reading

June 2019

This month is right in the middle of the birthing season for Red deer which runs from mid May until mid July; usually one fawn is born but occasionally there can be two. The hind will hide away to give … Continue reading

May 2019

This month Rhododendrons start to come into flower and very beautiful they are; Sheringham Park is a good place to see them in all their glory. The original wild Rhododendron is native to parts of Asia and the southern Mediterranean … Continue reading

April 2019

This month you may come across the very distinctive Drinker moth caterpillar, so called because it likes to drink dew drops from grass stems. This caterpillar goes into hibernation in October when partly grown, where it spends the winter, to … Continue reading